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Wayne L. Klein, PhD

Neuropsychological Assessment of Children & Adults; Couples & Individual Psychotherapy Offices in Franklin, MA & Spaulding Center for Children, Sandwich, MA
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Self-Regulation.com
Bullying
There are many possible factors contributing to why a bully targets one person rather than another. The victim may be physically smaller or weaker, have different interests, be less assertive than peers, evoke jealousy, be impulsive and fail to respect boundaries, have poor social skills, be unable to read emotional cues due to Autism, Asperger's or PDD or a Nonverbal Learning Disability, be highly reactive and thus "fun to bully," lack peer social supports or just be in the wrong place at the wrong time. Boys are more likely to use physical prowess to bully. Girls are more likely to use social and verbal weapons. This video discuses bullying among girls. Download the Ophelia Project brochure on bullying.
 
 
Helpful Links:
 
 

Ophelia Project

Online Course on School Aggression (continuing ed. credit for counselors & MSW)
 

Bullies often have a history of being bullied and will often meet the criteria for Oppositional Defiant Disorder

Anti-Bully Law a critical view